Game news on Readyforgame.com – Free Online games!

All News List

2014-04-24
Credit: Games Marketing Summit Speaking on a panel at the 2014 Games Marketing Summit in San Francisco, market research company EEDAR revealed that, according to their research, the number of gamers in China surpasses the total number of citizens in the United States. The panel was focused on marketing trends in the gaming industry and featured representatives from Microsoft, Sony, EEDAR, and Ubisoft. The exact numbers according to a slide said, "There are 1.6 Chinese gamers for each American Citizen (517M vs. 317M)." Of that 517 million person Chinese gaming audience: 147M are core gamers 28% play more than 1 hour/day 9.7% have spent money Core genres = 70% of revenue Just last year, China lifted a 13-year ban on console gaming systems, however the Chinese gaming censorship rules are more than a little strict. Of course, this doesn't mean there's going to be any immediate change in the direction game development takes, and gaming piracy still runs rampant through large parts of Asia, which makes it a difficult area to work in. But as China opens up, we'll likely start to see incremental changes both in the types of games we play and what type of audience they're targeted at.   Info from Gamespot.com
2014-04-24
The magic of Skylanders--at least for its young target audience--has always been in how it mixes the physical and the virtual. For a kid, it's exciting to have physical, quality figurines to play with in the real world, before taking virtual avatars of those same characters on adventures within a game. It's a recipe that has worked well with the previous Skylanders games, but for the next installment in the series, publisher Activision and developer Toys For Bob are adding a new element that, according to executive producer Jeff Poffenbarger, will help bring "life to toys." And how will the new game--Skylanders Trap Team--bring life to inanimate objects? It will attempt to do it through the power of... speakers. Trap Team will come with a new physical portal (dubbed the Traptanium Portal) that has a built-in speaker that allows you to hear the voices of bosses you capture within the game. Once you've captured a boss, you can then use that boss as a fully playable character in your adventures, swapping between your Skylander and the boss at any time. Portal Master Snap Shot astride the new Traptanium Portal.   Poffenbarger demonstrated this new mechanic to me during a recent interview about Skylanders Trap Team. Using one of the new Skylander types being introduced in the game--the Portal Masters--he fought a boss named the chompy mage. Once defeated, the captured mage was "teleported" to the Traptanium Portal, and his audio dialogue, which had been booming from the television, was now coming out through the portal's tiny speaker (Chompy Mage complained about the cramped new place he found himself in). It was an interesting effect, and for the most part was a neat gimmick that helped with the illusion that a virtual creature was now somehow contained within the real-world portal. Kids will most likely love it. A water elemental Trap. Skylanders games, of course, are all about the companion toys, so there will be a new toy type that you'll need to buy to be able to capture in-game bosses. These new toys are called traps, and they need to be inserted into the portal to capture a defeated boss. Traps have elemental alignments, and you'll only be able to capture a boss using the appropriate elemental trap. Skylanders Trap Team's starter pack will come with two traps (as well as one of the new Portal Masters, the new portal, and a regular-size Skylander), and Poffenbarger says you'll be able to complete the game with just the starter pack toys. Thankfully, Poffenbarger says an individual trap can hold multiple bosses, and as was the case with the earlier games, all previous toys will again be compatible for use with the new portal. But if the experience of previous Skylanders games are anything to go by, relying on just the starter pack toys will mean there'll be areas and missions you simply won't be able to access. And with only two traps, you'll only be able to get a fraction of the bosses that's available in Trap Team. If you're a huge Skylanders fan or a parent of one, then this hobby just became a little more expensive thanks to the addition of this new toy type. Skylanders Trap Team will be released on October 5, 2014 for the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Wii, Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Wii U, and 3DS.   Info from Gamespot.com
2014-04-23
    2K Games announced today in a post on its Support site that as a result of the GameSpy Technology closure, it will transition some legacy games to Valve's Steamworks and end support altogether for others. First, the games that are going offline for good come May 31: Borderlands (PS3)* Civilization Revolution (PS3)* Close Combat First to Fight (PC / Mac) Jetfighter (PC) Jetfighter V: Homeland Protector (PC) Leadfoot (PC) Rune (PC) Stronghold 2 (PC) Stronghold Legends (PC) Top Spin (PS2 / PC) Top Spin 2 (PC / DS) Vietcong (PC) Vietcong Demo (PC) Vietcong Fist Alpha (PC) Vietcong 2 (PC) Vietcong 2 Demo (PC) MLB Fantasy All-Stars (DS) Sid Meier's Civilization Revolution (DS) Major League Baseball 2K9 Fantasy All-Stars (DS) NHL 2K10 (Wii) NBA 2K10 (Wii) *2K says it is currently looking into the "technical feasibility" of transitioning Borderlands (PS3) and Civilization Revolution (PS3) to another network. But that's all we know right now. Of course, you'll still be able to play all of these games offline. Also on May 31, the original Borderlands (PC) and various Civilization games will temporarily go offline while 2K completes a server transition from GameSpy Technology to Steamworks. During this time, players will experience interruption of online play, matchmaking, and VOIP. Offline play is unaffected. Below is a list of 2K games that will be transitioned to Steamworks starting May 31. Borderlands (PC) Civilization III Civilization III: Conquests Civilization III: Play the World Civilization IV Civilization IV: Beyond the Sword Civilization IV: Colonization Civilization IV: Warlords "We apologize for the inconvenience this may cause," 2K said in a statement. 2K is not the only publisher facing issues from the impending closure of GameSpy. Crytek announced last week that the PC versions of Crysis and Crysis 2 are going offline on May 31. Electronic Arts is also affected, and has pledged to find other means to keep old Battlefield games alive after May 31. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-04-23
  World of Warcraft developer Blizzard Entertainment has launched a new initiative for its free-to-play card game, Hearthstone: Heroes of Warcraft, that encourages players to leave their homes and meet up with other gamers in the real world. The initiative is called Fireside Gatherings. By meeting up with other players in places like coffee shops, book stores, or dorm rooms at college, you can show off your deck, trade strategy secrets, or host tournaments, Blizzard says. If you participate in a Fireside Gathering, you'll earn a new "Fireside Friends" card back for your collection. To get the card back, you'll need to play three matches of Hearthstone against another player on the same network using this criteria: At least three people (including yourself) must be logged into Hearthstone on the same subnet.Each match must be played against a player that is playing on the same subnet as you.These matches can be played against your friends or using the Player Near Me feature, as long as the above two criteria are met. You can find a Hearthstone get-together near you at Blizzard's Fireside Gatherings website. Blizzard has even partnered with schools like the University of California Irvine, University of North Texas, and University of North Carolina Charlotte to hold the events. But if you can't find a location near you, you can host your own and Blizzard has even put together a document with some tips and tricks about how to do so successfully. Hearthstone is available today for PC and iPad. It's on schedule to arrive for Android sometime later this year. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-04-23
  Blizzard Entertainment announced today that BlizzCon 2014--its annual two-day event celebrating all-things Warcraft, StarCraft, and Diablo--will be held November 7-8. Like last year, BlizzCon 2014 will be held at the Anaheim Convention Center, just 20 minutes from Blizzard Entertainment's headquarters in Irvine, California. If history serves as precedent, you'll want to act quickly, as BlizzCon tickets normally sell out very quickly. Tickets for BlizzCon 2014 go on sale across two batches, the first of which will be available on May 7, while the second will go on sale May 10. Tickets are $200, plus taxes and fees. You'll also be able to buy tickets to a pre-BlizzCon dinner to benefit the Children's Hospital of Orange County starting on May 14. They will be available for $750 and all proceeds go to the hospital. If you can't attend BlizzCon 2014 in person, Blizzard will also sell virtual tickets like they have done in past years. Pricing, availability, and programming information for the BlizzCon virtual ticket will be announced at a later date. BlizzCon 2014 attendees will be able to go hands-on with the latest version of Blizzard games, witness eSports events like the StarCraft II World Championship Series Global Finals, and attend discussion panels with developers and artists. "More activities and attractions" for this year's show will be announced, including potentially a Saturday evening concert. Last year, Blizzard brought on Blink 182 to play. Past performers have included The Offspring, Tenacious D, and Foo Fighters. Blizzard didn't say which upcoming games it will have on display at BlizzCon 2014, but it's likely we'll see World of Warcraft: Warlords of Draenor and Heroes of the Storm. By November 2014, Blizzard may also be ready to talk about the third StarCraft II expansion, Legacy of the Void, though that's not confirmed of course. There's even a chance Blizzard could finally reveal its long-in-development next-gen MMO Titan, though maybe that's just wishful thinking. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-04-23
  If you preorder The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt from CD Projekt Red's own virtual storefront, GOG, it sounds like you're in for a treat. The preorder bonuses for the game there will be "f***ing amazing," according to studio head Marcin Iwinski. "There was a question here...about how good the Witcher 3 preorder [bonuses] will be on GOG; it will be f***ing amazing, guys," Iwinski said during a Twitch stream this afternoon, but unfortunately, he did not say more. We followed up with him after the stream ended for more information, but he wouldn't budge. "It will be excellent and that's all I can say right now," he said. The Witcher 3 is not yet available for preorder at GOG. CD Projekt Red stands defiantly against DRM, so that's one bonus already that PC gamers can expect if they buy the game through GOG. Originally scheduled to release this fall, CD Projekt Red recently delayed The Witcher 3 to February 2015. In addition to PC, the game is coming to Xbox One and PlayStation 4. Iwinski said previously that releasing the game on Xbox 360 or PlayStation 3, and keeping its spirit intact, would be impossible.   Info from Gamespot.com
2014-04-23
Players looking to get a slightly more robust version of upcoming BioWare RPG Dragon Age: Inquisition have at least one option open to them, as Electronic Arts today announced the PC digital deluxe version. For a $10 premium--this version is priced at $69.99 on Origin--players get a variety of digital goodies. Those include a digital soundtrack and unspecific "digital content" still to be announced, as well as the Flames of the Inquisition DLC pack (consisting of new weapons, armor, and a mount) that will be offered to those who preorder the standard version of the game. Also included are three items to help set you apart in the world of Inquisition: a throne made from a dragon skull called the Skyhold Throne, a horned mount called Red Hart Halla, and a Bog Unicorn mount, which is hopefully more intimidating than it sounds. A proper physical collector's edition of Inquisition has yet to be announced, though BioWare continues to indicate one is coming. The official Dragon Age Twitter account sent out a tweet today saying an announcement regarding the collector's edition will be made in the "next few weeks." It also told fans eager to preorder the game today to hold off a bit longer if they were interested in the collector's edition. One day after the game's box art was revealed, we learned today that Inquisition will arrive on all platforms --Xbox 360, Xbox One, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, and PC--on October 7. While the Xbox 360 and PS3 versions won't look as good as the others, BioWare says the gameplay itself hasn't been compromised in order to work on those systems. For more on Inquisition, check out GameSpot's newly published interview with executive producer Mark Darrah. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-04-23
The Peggle 2 store, which has been listed in the game's main menu since launch but been inaccessible, is now live and brings it with it a brand new Peggle master for players to purchase. Windy the Fairy is the game's sixth master and features the Fairy Flock power. With it, anytime a green peg is activated, four random blue pegs will turn into purple ones worth many more points. Windy is the main addition in the newly released Windy's Master Pack DLC. In addition to her, the DLC includes 10 new levels, 10 new trials, 30 objectives, three costumes, and three achievements for $1.99. This is the first premium DLC to be released for Peggle 2 since its launch on the Xbox One in December. Also new to the game today is a colorblind mode that can be toggled on in the Options menu. Like the update adding Duel mode last month, colorblind support comes as part of a free update that is now available.   Info from Gamespot.com
2014-04-23
There are people out there who are more jaded by FIFA's yearly release cycle than they are by the schoolboy "tactics" Roy Hodgson employs as England manager. Year after year we're asked to part with our hard-earned cash in exchange for a game that, on the surface at least, changes little with each iteration. Stand-alone tournament editions, such as 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil, are sandwiched between releases of full FIFA games and do little to quell such negative opinion. However, perhaps even more so than the criminally forgotten gems like UEFA Euro 2008 and 2010 World Cup South Africa FIFA, World Cup Brazil comes with more than enough content and ideas to justify its existence as a game in its own right. Although, to what extent depends on how you're currently fulfilling your FIFA needs. If you've already made the step up to FIFA 14 on either the PlayStation 4 or Xbox One, then you're going to be disappointed by what's on offer. With World Cup Brazil available only on previous-gen consoles, the absence of the slick animations and upgraded physics system of the next-gen versions is very much visible here.   While there's a nice array of new passing, shooting, and jostling animations, the core mechanics driving the action on the field lack the finesse and depth of the PS4 and Xbox One FIFA 14 experience. This rings especially true when you're defending, with the AI largely unable to deal with players boasting a combination of raw pace and accuracy of shooting. Time and time again, the greatest defenders on earth (the likes of Vincent Kompany, Thiago Silva, and Giorgio Chiellini) are made to look the fool by mediocre strikers packing just those two attributes. This may all be part of the plan, though. These tournament editions have always been seen as a chance for the FIFA design team to let loose and have a bit of fun, so the favouring of attacking flair over defensive nuance is very likely a case of intended design over inferior AI. In practice, this creates a game that's more fun than realistic, offering an experience that is markedly different from that of FIFA 14. Captain Your Country sees you compete against teammates in a bid to wear the armband on World Cup Final day. Shooting, in particular, has been made much more accessible. A well-struck ball flies through the air as though tethered to a guided missile, making the taking of long-range potshots a more viable option than it has been in recent years. Invariably, this leads to some spectacular attempts on goal, which naturally lead to spectacular goals. These kinds of goals, from the audacious to the sublime, very much belong in a game that so heavily features the vibrant backdrop of Brazil and its football team--a team that is seen as the embodiment of exciting, attacking football. In a bid to counter the venom of shooting, goalies seem to have been given an ability boost and are thus able to prevent the scoreline from getting out of hand. They don't always catch the ball or knock it into a safe area, but they are more likely to push it away for a corner or punch it to the edge of the box and give their defenders a chance to clear it properly. Additionally, it's now much more difficult to score from corners thanks to the new over-the-back headers players can employ. Rather than simply standing limp and lifeless as an attacker cuts in front to score with his head at the near post (a trick that could be ruthlessly exploited to great success in previous FIFA games), defenders can now jump up using the shoulders of anyone in their way in a desperate bid to head the ball first. This new trick helps, perhaps more than any other element, in keeping the number of goals to a believable tally in the face of the improved shooting. Much more focus has been spent on making each and every match feel like a genuine spectacle. Hopefully this will carry on to future FIFA titles.   Any and all of these gameplay tweaks would be rendered useless without sufficient content within which to make use of them. Captain Your Country and Road to the FIFA World Cup are the most robust and exhaustive game modes to conquer, joining the obvious inclusions of the World Cup tournament itself and the essential set of online and offline exhibition matches. Captain Your Country sees you take control of a single player as your team sets out to qualify for, and win, the World Cup. As its name suggests, your goal within that framework is to distinguish yourself and become national captain along the way. Road to the FIFA World Cup allows you to rewrite the course of history and take a team from the qualification rounds, on to the tournament proper, and into Rio's Estadio do Maracana to contest the final on 13 July. All 203 officially recognised FIFA national teams are included and available for selection, allowing you to undo the injustices associated with the likes of Sweden and Poland failing to qualify for this summer's carnival. If you prefer to take your game online and compete with other human players, then Road to Rio De Janeiro is the mode with the most staying power. There you're promoted and relegated through different divisions in a bid to match you with players that are roughly your equal, which makes for some compelling matches. What makes World Cup Brazil a different proposition to other recent FIFA games is the care and dedication that have gone into the little details. You've got the option of choosing between two prerecorded radio stations as you navigate menus, both of which are excellent and add colour to events by way of dissecting your future opponents and commenting on the journey teams took to reach the World Cup. Over-the-back headers do a lot to prevent strikers scoring easy goals from corners, free kicks and crosses into the box.   Then there are the little visual presentation touches: managers that shout and command from the sidelines, cutaways to fans celebrating goals in front of screens in their home country, and goalkeepers who can perform dances and shuffles to unnerve penalty takers, and there's even a digital Sepp Blatter who attends important fixtures. Unfortunately, the graphical quality of the crowds remains as terrible as it has ever been on the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360, but at least there's more variety to their celebrations this time around. It's best to consider 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil as a less serious, more accessible accompaniment to the main FIFA series. Focused more on giving you a good time than on advancing the quest for realism in sports games, this is a football game that's perfect for fans who are looking for a way to pass the hours between World Cup matches this summer. Beyond that, it may not be as exhaustive as the likes of FIFA 14, but with its own distinct feel and modes to explore, there's more than enough to keep you distracted before FIFA 15 lands later in the year. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-04-23
The sequel to Final Fantasy music game Theatrhythm, Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: Curtain Call, is coming to the 3DS in North America later this year, Square Enix has announced. Much like its predecessor, Curtain Call has players tapping along to songs made famous by Final Fantasy games from throughout the series. 221 songs in all are included, including tracks from Final Fantasy Tactics and animated film Advent Children right up to the most recent games in the franchise, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn and Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII. More than 60 playable characters, also from a variety of past Final Fantasy games, are featured as well. These include the likes of Final Fantasy VII's Barret, Crisis Core's Zack, and Final Fantasy X-2's Yuna, as well as lesser-known characters such as spin-off Final Fantasy Mystic Quest's Benjamin. Curtain Call offers a competitive head-to-head mode for battling other players in addition to a Quest Medley mode that allow players to choose their path through "unique" quests of varying lengths. As they make their way through the game, players will collect cards that can in turn be used to boost characters' stats. Square Enix didn't provide a specific release date for Curtain Call, only saying it will be available "later this year" for $39.99. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-04-23
The future of virtual reality has never seemed brighter. The pioneering Oculus VR company was bought for $2 billion by Facebook last month, and Sony is even getting into the game with their Project Morpheus. But is the tech just a fad, or does it really have a chance of going mainstream this time? Oculus CEO Palmer Luckey voiced some strong opinions about VR's future at PAX East this month stating, "If you can perfectly simulate reality, why do you need to actually go see people in real life?" and, "I think there's almost no way that traditional displays will be around in a couple decades because it just won't be feasible." Admittedly, he has a vested interest in the Oculus doing well, but how realistic are his claims? GameSpot's editors share their thoughts below. Eddie Makuch - Is this the real life, or is this just fantasy? "If you can perfectly simulate reality, why do you need to actually go see people in real life?" When I first read this quote from 21-year-old Oculus Rift creator Palmer Luckey I was deeply disturbed. It's a comment that challenges everything you think you know. What he's really asking is: What if everything you think you know is a lie or at least a half truth? If the reality in which we think we live right now can be perfectly simulated, then is it a "real" reality at all? Or is it just a Matrix-like projection? What does it mean to be real anyway? These are big questions that I'm not sure Luckey ever intended to drum up, but here we are all the same. I place significant value in seeing and interacting with people face-to-face. I also enjoy spending time outdoors, feeling the wind on my skin or the touch of water on my feet. These are experiences that I deem to be "real." But if Luckey is right, if virtual reality technology can progress to a point where what I deem to be "real" and what headsets like Oculus Rift can project becomes indistinguishable, then he's truly onto an idea that could shake the world. There is a deeper and more profound philosophical discussion to be had here, but I am not in any way equipped to engage in that. Assuming VR headsets cost $200 each, that's a pretty significant premium if I want to have some friends over to watch a game or a movie in VR. The grand promise of virtual reality headsets is that when you put them on, your brain is fully tricked into believing it's somewhere else. I have tried out virtual reality technology and the current iteration does not come anywhere close to meeting this lofty goal. It could some day, and the resources from Facebook will no doubt help, but let's not get ahead of ourselves here. Luckey's job is to sell you on the idea of virtual reality, and while I see the potential, the immediate results have left much to be desired. Regarding Luckey's claim about virtual reality technology like Oculus Rift replacing traditional displays over the next 10-20 years, I don't think that's going to happen unless VR headsets become very inexpensive. Right now, I can pay $300 for a 32" 1080p HD TV that I can enjoy with a group of friends in the living room. Assuming VR headsets cost $200 each, that's a pretty significant premium if I want to have some friends over to watch a game or a movie in VR. Not to mention I need a place to store all of those headsets! Of course, if VR gathers steam, and with Facebook behind it, it seems likely that it will, then price will come down over time. Still, I generally do not like the idea of putting something on my head to watch what I can already see without assistance. Kevin VanOrd - A future no one wants Whenever I express my misgivings about Oculus Rift to its greatest advocates, I'm always told how I have to use it to really understand its potential. It's true that my time with the Oculus Rift has been limited, but my doubts have never been based on the quality of the Oculus experience. Instead, my doubts has been practical ones based on the way I consume games and other visual media like television and films. Specifically, I don't always want to be fully immersed.   There are those times, of course, in which I want to exist in a fully simulated reality. I think we all share in those moments; otherwise, why would concepts like Star Trek's holodeck capture our collective imagination? But much of my game playing and TV watching is done casually. I grab a few rounds of Titanfall while dinner is cooking, I watch reruns while cleaning the living room, I reach over and pet the cat while exploring Tamriel in The Elder Scrolls Online. Yes, I would greatly appreciate being able to play a survival horror game while fully immersed in its setting; yes, I would love to watch Game of Thrones without any distraction. But most of the time, I don't want to attach something to my head that demands my attention for every moment it's strapped there. I don't want intensity to be the defining factor of every game I play and show I watch. There's an innate intensity to using the Oculus Rift that makes it well-suited to a very specific circumstance. But I don't want intensity to be the defining factor of every game I play and show I watch. And I surely don't want that kind of intensity to characterize the time I spend watching television with friends, when I would rather engage directly with them. Make no mistake: the technology is neat, but Luckey's personal vision of the future is a surreal tragicomedy that reminds me of the vast spaceship the heroic robot visits in the second half of Wall-E, where the residents speed along in their hoverchairs, using displays to speak to people seated within arm's length. Even if I did believe that Luckey's bizarre goal to physically separate us in favor of virtual interaction was feasible--which I absolutely do not--I still wouldn't want that kind of future. I'm hardly a technophobe, but I'm disturbed by a man that would outright state that he wants his product not just to enhance reality, but to replace it. Peter Brown - Relax, it's not a dystopian daydream   Palmer Luckey is never short of thoughts on the potential for virtual reality, which isn't surprising given that he's made it his life's work, so to speak. Just last week, he claimed that once VR matures to its full potential, it may someday be capable of supplanting human interaction. A statement like that raises red flags for a lot of people, and they begin to draw comparisons to mad men from dystopian films and comic books as evidence of Luckey's folly.     To them I say: "Relax, please." By Luckey's own admission, the fully realized VR that he's talking about may never come to pass, and he's not suggesting that VR is better than real life. Luckey is plainly stating that if VR were to mature to the point that it can provide an experience that was indistinguishable from reality, we would have to ask ourselves why we value one experience over the other. The answer to that question is different for every person, and my personal belief is that VR, as it is today and as it could be in the future, isn't inherently evil, so there's no reason that we shouldn't pursue it.   Nobody is forcing VR on us, and delving into full immersion will be a choice. We don't live in a fictional world like The Matrix where a falsified reality is imposed upon the human race against its will. Nobody is forcing VR on us. Delving into full immersion will be a choice, and I am absolutely interested in experimenting with the technology if it ever comes to pass. During the same interview, Luckey asserts his belief that head-mounted displays like the Rift will replace traditional displays, potentially in 10 years. In this case, I think he's blindly ignoring the benefits of the way we currently consume media. I completely agree with some of his points, specifically that TVs are more expensive to produce and ship, and that there are applications and scenarios where a HMD will make more practical sense, but when it comes to consuming media in a group setting, traditional displays make the most sense. Do I expect there to be local, VR multiplayer games down the road? Yes, because I've already played some, but I seriously doubt that their existence, along with the associated cost of manufacturing and shipping displays, will lead to a complete HMD takeover.   Justin Haywald - Time keeps on slipping into the future When Luckey says that in 10-20 years VR could supplant traditional screens, everyone imagines people sitting at home with these massive, expensive Oculus sets attached to their heads. That's a ridiculous future, and of course it's not going to happen. But that's not the future Luckey is positing. In 20 years, or even in 10 years, the technology that we use to create those experiences will be smaller, better, and cheaper, and it'll probably also be almost unrecognizable. When you compare the massive cell phones from the '80s to the svelte mobile computers we use now, you can get a sense for this technology has the potential to change and adapt to everyday use. And maybe it's not ideal, but what if you could get an Oculus for free? As a trade-off, maybe you have to link it to your Facebook account and you'll see targeted ads when you use that service. That raises completely separate arguments about privacy and how we share content with the public, but the point is there are solutions for getting this kind of tech into everyone's hands. Maybe a VR future isn't the wonderful utopia we might imagine, but it's not as impossible as we might think.   Info from Gamespot.com
2014-04-23
Minecraft is a game all about freedom and customization, so the upcoming 1.8 update--which introduces new customization options for Minecraft's terrain generator--should be an especially welcome one. As demonstrated in the video above, the update provides players with new options when creating a world. There are now 16 sliders that dictate the terrain that is to be generated in addition to options for enabling and disabling things like lava oceans and water lakes. More advanced users are free to type in specific values for many of these aspects. Those simply interested in trying something different from what they're used to can choose from seven presets made by Mojang or find those created and shared by other players. The presets shown in the video give some sense of what's possible using these new options: One turns nearly every bit of land into an enormous mountain, one submerges the entire world underwater, and another scatters floating islands (which are making a comeback in this update) throughout the world. A release date for the 1.8 update has not yet been announced. Developer Jens Bergensten said on Twitter in March that his best guess for its launch was sometime in May. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-04-23
GameSpot's early access reviews evaluate unfinished games that are nonetheless available for purchase by the public. While the games in question are not considered finished by their creators, you may still devote money, time, and bandwidth for the privilege of playing them before they are complete. The review below critiques a work in progress, and represents a snapshot of the game at the time of the review's publication. Between Titanfall, MechWarrior Online, and other recent offerings on the giant-battling-robot front, mech combat enthusiasts have an ever-growing range of options. Hawken's stunning sci-fi battlescapes and impressively detailed robot designs are an attractive wrapper for the more fast-and-furious flavor of online free-to-play mech shooter action found underneath its hood. Piloting these slick metal death machines into the fray hits a sweet spot that you won't find in similar games. The raw speed and energetic momentum infused into Hawken's online matches almost contradict the nature of the game's hulking combatants, yet this different breed of multiplayer mech battler brings a new level of excitement to the genre in a way that feels oh-so-right. Are we on Tatooine, or what? Lots of mech games do a decent enough job of making you feel like you're strapped into a huge hunk of walking metal, but Hawken really nails it with flair. Hopping into the cockpit and taking your first heavy steps into this atmospheric sci-fi realm is a wild ride. Everything, from the way the control panel rocks as you thunder along to the visual damage and bleating alarms that grow progressively intense as you get thrashed by incoming fire, adds tremendous weight to the piloting experience. The powerful sights and sounds that accompany your every move help to draw you deeper into your role with effortless ease, inciting battle lust in the process. It's easy to be wooed by this pleasant sensory overload, but pausing for too long to admire your well-armed ride and the meticulously detailed surroundings is a fatal mistake. Hawken's firefights move at a fast clip. Despite their girth and heft on the battlefield, mechs are surprisingly agile, thanks to fuel-powered jump jets that let you sidestep incoming fire, leap over obstacles, glide short distances, and hover in place. This mobility is great, because it doesn't detract from the impact of being a mech pilot, and it keeps matches flowing. Even in larger battles, you can quickly find yourself flanked and torn asunder, leading you to make a hasty retreat so you can find a safe spot from which to deploy a repair drone. That's not a surefire stopgap to avoid getting sent to the scrap heap, however. The bigger they are, the bigger they 'splode. Hawken encourages a "stick together, stay alive" mentality--both through many natural elements of its design and in overt voice-overs suggesting as much--that spurs strategic teamwork. Taking time to repair on the battlefield is a dicey affair, because it's a slow process that leaves you vulnerable. Without a pal to watch your back, you're easy prey. Careful spotting and thoughtful sensor array placement are equally important. With a quick tap of a key, you can call out enemies on sight or even send out a distress signal to encourage teammates to flock to your location to lend a hand. All of this helps build a strong team dynamic that boosts the excitement when your squad clicks. The high energy flow of standard free-for-all and team deathmatches is fun in its own right and excellent for scoring experience and currency to beef up your mech fleet. That said, the epic scope of Hawken's other core modes holds a very different kind of thrill. Missile Assault puts a cool spin on point capture, since every missile station your team controls continually hurls rockets skyward. You can actually stand and watch each missile race off into the distance and collide with your foe's towering base structure, which collapses in spectacular explosions if you manage to wrest victory from your enemy's grasp. I've got your back, comrade! Siege mode ramps up the spectacle to an even grander scale with longer matches that involve hauling energy around the map and capturing antiaircraft cannons as you fight away. Powering up your base launches your team's Star Destroyer-style battleship, which pushes across the sky and hammers away at the enemy base until it destroys it or is shot down. These modes are a blast, and they do a phenomenal job of making your skirmishes feel like they're a critical part of a bigger conflict. Hawken sports some impressive battlefield designs. Maps are massive. They sprawl out in all directions and mix in high vantage points, loads of obstacles to use for cover, and subterranean regions to fight through. They're gorgeous too, and visually diverse enough to keep match cycles feeling fresh. You duke it out across murky swamps, dark forests, bright sci-fi cityscapes, dusty dune settlements, icy tundras, and more. This diversity extends to the wide assortment of mechs you pilot. Taking time to repair on the battlefield is a dicey affair, because it's a slow process that leaves you vulnerable. Without a pal to watch your back, you're easy prey. From light and zippy scout mechs to more-sluggish heavily armored brutes and everything in between, there's a ride for all tastes and fighting styles. Different handling, armor, weapon loadouts, and combat roles also leave lots of room for tactical variety. Picking off foes through the scope of a long-range sniper mech offers a different kind of satisfaction from hopping into an ordnance-heavy mech and deluging the enemy with clusters of rockets. Other specialties and special abilities are geared toward support, assault, assassination, and defense to round out your options. Despite their strengths and weaknesses, the mechs are balanced enough that none of them feel overpowered. Unlocking them, unfortunately, can be a slow and tedious process if you don't want to shell out a bit of real cash for bonus experience boosts or instant-unlock access to speed things along. Experience you gain in battle goes toward your overall pilot level as well as the individual mechs you use in a given encounter, and leveling up grants you access to new mechs, weapons, and accessories to purchase. That's all fine, except that the more you switch up your mechs in battle, the slower you progress is with each individual mech. Mayday! Maydayyyy! Almost everything you can buy in the game, ranging from optional custom color schemes and decorations to mechs and weapon components, can be bought with accumulated in-game cash you accrue through playing matches. It's just faster to unlock these items with paid meteor credits. But even if you want a little nudge to ease the grind, temporary XP and money boosters are quite cheap. On the whole, nothing is outrageously expensive, so it all comes down to a matter of patience and playtime. The sheer time it takes to make substantive progress across your mech fleet is a muddy point in an otherwise excellent game. Does it have a huge impact on the overall quality of the experience? Not really. Hawken is plenty of fun as a free ride, and it's worth sinking a bit of real money into it to ease the slower stretches and fully customize your favorite killer robo-suits. This mech shooter goes far above and beyond what you'd expect in a free-to-play offering, with an impressive visual design and intense, rewarding gameplay to match. What's There? 17 mechs to pilot and upgrade, lots of big battlegrounds, excellent and unique large-scale battle modes, and seemingly customization options. What's to Come? Hawken is in the late stages of development, and much of the development focus currently seems to be on fine-tuning match making, making sure any bugs are stomped, and adding additional detail. You can, however, expect to see some new mechs in future updates. What Does it Cost? Nothing, unless you feel inclined to spend money to speed up you mech fleet's progression and customization. Shelling out actual real-world cash lets you unlock mechs early, grab XP and coin earning boosts, and outfit your mechs faster. When Will it Be Finished? No specific word yet on a final release, but Hawken already looks and feels like a finished product. What's the Verdict? Hawken is more than just an excellent free-to-play multiplayer shooter: it's mech combat done right. The game gorgeous and a blast to play, but leveling-up requires patience and a bit of grinding.   Info from Gamespot.com
2014-04-23
If you're looking purely at sales numbers for the last generation of consoles, Nintendo's Wii was far and away at the top of the pile, selling more units than the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. Despite this, there are plenty of people who think that there were no "good" games released for Nintendo's groundbreaking console. We're here to bust that myth with our list of the must-have games for the Wii. Do you agree with our choices? Sound off in the comments below. Call of Duty Black Ops "Call of Duty: Black Ops on the Wii is almost every bit as excellent as its HD console counterparts. New modes and mechanics give a jolt of energy to the lively competitive multiplayer; the engrossing new campaign is one of the best in the series; Combat Training mode allows anyone to enjoy the thrills of arena combat; and Zombies mode provides a goofy, gory diversion." Donkey Kong Country Returns "Donkey Kong Country Returns doesn't hide behind any gimmicks. This is a traditional take on 2D platformers, and it excels because the brilliant level design makes old obstacles seem new again. Every level hides a new surprise, and you'll replay them over and over again not only to nab every hidden collectible, but also because they're exquisitely entertaining." Kirby's Epic Yarn "Kirby's Epic Yarn makes it clear from the get-go that it is an adorable game that will put a smile on your face through its outstanding visual design, but the delights go much deeper than the delectable aesthetics. Clever levels with varied objectives make it a blast to play, and though the main story is way too easy, there are at least challenging minigames to unlock for those who want to test their reflexes." Mario Kart Wii "The all-new stunt system, simplified drifting mechanics, natural motion controls, and expansive online integration all come together in a single package that, despite a few hiccups, is one of the best and most accessible experiences available on the Nintendo Wii." Rock Band 3 "Rock Band 3 not only introduces new and exciting things to the world of rhythm games, but it does almost everything better than those that have come before it. When it comes to accessible, inventive, and immensely entertaining music video games, nobody does it better than Rock Band 3." Metroid Prime 3: Corruption "If you expected Metroid Prime 3: Corruption to be a high-quality continuation of the series, you'd be right. And yes, the Wii controls are terrific and intuitive, so if you hoped that controlling bounty hunter Samus Aran would be a dream, that wish has been granted, too." Monster Hunter Tri "This action/role-playing series finally reaches its potential with Tri, which renders its wild paradise in beautiful detail and lets you team up with friends or strangers online to tame it. A few of the game's facets are stubbornly mired in the past, such as a couple of awkward control issues and some online oddities. But this is, finally, what Monster Hunter had the potential to be all along: intense, involving, and most importantly, great fun." New Super Mario Bros Wii "New Super Mario Bros. Wii has more than nostalgia to back it up. While it doesn't stray too far from what's come before it, New Super Mario Bros. Wii's tight gameplay, multitude of secrets, accessibility for newcomers thanks to the nifty Super Guide, and some fun multiplayer additions all add up to a great platformer that Mario fans and nonfans alike should enjoy." No More Heroes "The fantastic combat is more than enough reason to revisit No More Heroes. This time, SUDA-51 has delivered a game that can match its absurd premise with equally stimulating gameplay, making for one of the most unique and satisfying action games in recent memory."  Okami "There's much more to this game than you've probably come to expect from the typical action adventure experience, and the game is so well crafted from top to bottom that it's bound to impress just about anyone who gives it a chance." Punch-Out!! "Although the Wii version of Punch-Out plays almost identically to the NES original, the formula is still as intense, addictive, and fun as it ever was. The roster is mostly composed of fighters from the earlier games, but they are as exhilarating to fight now as they were the first time and come with a number of new moves and techniques that will flummox even the more hardened Punch-Out veterans." Resident Evil 4 "The best games are worth playing through all over again. Not only does RE4 itself remain a heart-pounding thrill ride and a modern classic, but the Wii Remote and Nunchuk controls breathe new life into a game that is still a treat to play." Dead Space: Extraction "Dead Space Extraction has been built from the ground up to offer a more strategic, story-oriented experience that acts as a second meaningful entry in the Dead Space universe. Extraction pulls no punches and delivers an uncompromised horror experience, complete with the series' famous strategic dismemberment, spooky atmosphere, and intense action." Super Mario Galaxy 2 "It's the expertly designed levels that will keep you coming back, even after you've seen everything this game has to offer, just to experience it one more time. This is an instant classic that belongs alongside the best games Nintendo has ever created." Super Paper Mario "Super Paper Mario stands as an engaging and fun Wii game that's well worth your time. Super Paper Mario's humorous story, accessible gameplay, inventive design, cool visual style, and impressive amount of content give it an undeniable charm. Anyone with a Wii should check it out." Super Smash Bros. Brawl "Whether you're a diehard Smash Bros. fanatic or a neophyte brawler, you'll be pleased to know that Super Smash Bros. Brawl includes a plethora of impressive characters, features, and game modes, and is more accessible and fun than ever before." Super Mario Galaxy 2 is one of the best games ever. Ever. Tatsunoko vs Capcom: Ultimate All Stars "While fighting veterans will revel in Tatsunoko vs. Capcom's deeply satisfying combat, the game is without a doubt one of the easiest in the genre to jump into, thanks to control schemes that cater to everyone from brawling neophytes to air combo aficionados." The Last Story "It's a familiar tale, but The Last Story is far from a familiar game. It's a deep, fast-paced JRPG, that evolves the genre in ways that enhance its existing tropes, without stripping away at its soul." The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess "Twilight Princess is a great game that stays extremely true to the Zelda franchise's past. That's excellent news for fans of the series, who'll find in Twilight Princess a true-blue Zelda game with updated visuals, some new twists, plenty of challenging puzzles, and a faithful dedication to the series' roots." WarioWare: Smooth Moves "This game is totally built around the Wii Remote and maintains, if not surpasses, the level of absolute random insanity that has made the whole series so appealing. It's a terrific use of the Wii's unique control features, it looks amazing, and in short, it should be a part of your library." Wii Fit "Wii Fit takes the whole concept of games as exercise to a new level with the inclusion of a balance board peripheral that can tell you on the fly exactly how well--or how poorly--you're doing with its various activities. As such, Nintendo is heavily marketing this innovative title as a mixture of fitness and fun, and for the most part it works." Wii Sports Resort "holiday. Wii Sports Resort shines as a fun, accessible, and varied multiplayer experience, and while not all of its minigames are top-notch, there's plenty here to make this a great party game for any Wii owner." Xenoblade in action. Xenoblade Chronicles "It has everything that seasoned JRPG veterans are looking for, but it also manages to lift the barrier for entry for those new to the genre. It retains the traditions it wants to and modernises the aspects it needs to. It's not only one of the best JRPGs in years; it's also one of the best RPGs regardless of subgenre. Xenoblade Chronicles is a captivating, magical game which deserves to be hailed as the revolution it is." Zack and Wiki Quest for Barbaros' Treasure "It might not win you over with its characters or story, but it will with its wonderfully crafted puzzles and sharp control mechanics. It's just the sort of game Wii owners have been pining for, the sort of game that blends accessibility and challenge into one seamless whole, and does it without devolving into yet another minigame collection." House of the Dead: Overkill "Overkill reinvents the aging shooter series for the better with an over-the-top grindhouse theme that resonates in its every aspect, from the hilarious story to the fantastic vintage soundtrack." * GameSpot's Best Of Lists will updated periodically as new games worthy of inclusion are released on their respective platforms. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-04-23
  Series creator Shu Takumi is at work on a brand-new Ace Attorney game that takes the series more than a century into the past. According to details from the latest Famitsu (as translated by Siliconera), The Great Ace Attorney is set during Japan's Meiji period, which took place from 1868 - 1912. Players will assume the role of Ryunosuke Naruhodo, an ancestor of Phoenix Wright (whose last name is Naruhodo in Japanese). The game is set to come to 3DS and will be directed by Takumi. Also involved with development is producer Shintaro Kojima, whose previous work includes the Monster Hunter series. Details beyond the setting and names--which, keep in mind, haven't yet been announced in English--were not shared. The most recent game in the Ace Attorney series to be released in North America was Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney - Dual Destinies for 3DS last October. Meanwhile, the spin-off Professor Layton vs. Phoenix Wright is scheduled for release on 3DS sometime this year. Info from Gamespot.com


Keywords:

Free online games to play and download! More than 1000 free flash games updated daily, free online web games, games to play free, free download, free games to download, free download games, ready for game, ready for games, игры, безплатная игра, angry birds, mario, arcade, puzzle, shooting, free online games, monster trucks, action games, card online, pool games, strategic games, all games for free, play free online games, jeux en ligne gratuits, gratis aanlyn speletjies, lojra online falas, besplatne online igre, online hry zdarma, gratis online spil, gratis online spelletjes, kostenlose Online Spiele, giochi online gratis, jocuri online gratuite, бесплатные онлайн игры, Juegos online, ücretsiz online oyun, Jocs en línia, meine front, meinefront, run mario, penguin dinner, deus racer, sudoku, motor wheels, ultimate force, play and download free flash games, download free swf game files, best games

Advertisement

Contacts

All questions and suggestions for site

Email us: support@readyforgame.com

Social Stalking

Login

LOG IN

Register

User Registration
or Cancel