Game news on Readyforgame.com – Free Online games!

All News List

2014-02-27
  Platoons are coming to Battlefield 4 on February 27, developer DICE announced this week. For those unaware, the Platoons program allows players to get together via Battlelog as a means to communicate and coordinate more easily. DICE says its ambition for the feature is to make it as "powerful and intuitive as possible." When Platoons roll out later this week, players can expect the following: The ability to create and join a Platoon for up to 100 members. Basic Platoon management such as inviting, applying, and promoting/demoting members. A private and public Platoon feed, where you can communicate and coordinate. A Platoon emblem and tag that all members can easily apply. The ability to earn stats for your Platoon and rank it up, and see all the matches you played together. Platoons for Battlefield 4 will also support several customization options. In addition to choosing your own Platoon name and four-character tag, users can design their own emblem, which all members will be able to use. You can also earn stats and rank up using Battlefield 4's new Platoons program. In order to earn stats, four players from the same Platoon must play together in the same round of Battlefield 4; your stats will then either be average or accumulated and applied to your Platoon, DICE said. Your Platoon can also rank up, initially from 1-10, but more ranks will come later. A Platoon's kill/death ratio, score per minute, and skill will also be displayed. Regarding launch timing, DICE said Platoons will begin rolling out on Battlelog on February 27, though some players will get in earlier. All players can join a Platoon, but you'll need a Battlefield 4 Premium membership ($50) and a soldier ranked 10 or higher to create your own. The Platoon system is also platform agnostic, so a Battlefield 4 player on PC could be in the same Platoon as a player on PlayStation 4, or any other combination. Finally, DICE pointed out that the version of Platoons rolling out this week is only the first iteration of the service. "We will continue to work on the feature to refine and expand it, but now we will finally have the opportunity to see it in action and get some real-world feedback. Now is the time for all our players to tell us what they like, what they want improved, and what they want to see next," DICE said. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-02-27
  Karen Gravano, the daughter of Salvatore "Sammy the Bull" Gravano who was recently a star of VH1's Mob Wives before she left the show, has filed a lawsuit against Take-Two Interactive, claiming her image and life story was ripped off in Grand Theft Auto V. She is seeking $20 million in compensation and another $20 million for punitive damages. "Notwithstanding the fact that plaintiff has the utmost respect for the writers and creators of the Grand Theft Auto V video game…her story is unique and is hers to tell,” papers filed in Manhattan Supreme Court Monday and obtained by the New York Daily News state. Gravano's lawyer Thomas Farinella said that the character Antonia Bottino is based on Gravano, who was not compensated or credited for the role. Bottino's in-game father, a former Gambetti family mob boss named Sammy (Sonny) Bottino, winds up becoming an informant, just like Gravano's real-world father did to help bring down John Gotti. Also in the game, Bottino does not allow her daughter to star in a fictional show called Wise Bitches, which is an obvious parody of Mob Wives. Gravano's lawsuit against Take-Two notes that Rockstar Games producers could have asked for her permission "with relative ease, which may have (averted) this action." Take-Two declined to comment to the New York Daily News and has not responded to GameSpot's request for statement. This lawsuit is not the first legal action levied against Take-Two since GTA V's record-setting launch in September when it generated over $1 billion in revenue in three days. In December, Mean Girls actress Lindsay Lohan said she planned to sue Take-Two, claiming her likeness was used without permission. And before that, Rapper Daz Dillinger accused Rockstar in October of using two of his songs in the game without permission, demanding that Rockstar give him more money for the songs or destroy all remaining unsold copies of GTA V. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-02-27
  Minecraft creator Markus "Notch" Persson has announced on Twitter that the original PC version of the open-ended sandbox game has reached 100 million registered users. But how many people have actually paid for a copy of the game on PC? With a 14.3 percent conversion rate to paid accounts, that's more than 14.3 million copies sold on PC alone. Of course, Minecraft is also available on platforms outside of the PC. The Xbox 360 version of the game has sold over 10 million copies, while the PlayStation 3 version sold more than 1 million units during its launch month of December 2013. Minecraft: Pocket Edition, for iOS and Android, has also been a hit, having sold more than 10 million copies as of May 2013. Versions of the game are also in development for the Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PlayStation Vita, but there's no word yet on a potential Wii U or 3DS version. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-02-27
  Warner Bros. today announced Cold, Cold Heart, the first story expansion for Batman: Arkham Origins. The content is described as "extensive," and will launch April 22 for Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, and PC. The content is not coming to Wii U due to a lack of demand. The Cold, Cold Heart expansion has players exploring the origin story of Mr. Freeze, where they will learn about how he became one of Batman's fiercest foes. The DLC is included with the $20 Batman: Arkham Origins season pass or can be purchased separately for $10. Cold, Cold Heart takes places in various Gotham City locations, including Wayne Manor, and gives players the new Batman Extreme Environment (XE) suit and gadgets like the Thermal Gloves and Thermocharged Batarangs. In all, the Cold, Cold Heart expansion is said to span "several hours" of gameplay. For more on Batman: Arkham Origins, check out GameSpot's review and in-depth interview with Batman voice actor Roger Craig Smith. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-02-27
  Prominent Nintendo shareholder Seth Fischer, one of Asia's most distinguished hedge fund managers, has urged the company to break with its decades-old strategy of only releasing software on proprietary systems and instead develop and sell mobile games for iOS and Android devices. "Nintendo needs to embrace this thematic change in consumer demand, behavior, and expectations to stay relevant," Fischer said in a letter addressed to Nintendo president Satoru Iwata and obtained by Reuters. Fischer is the chief investment officer at Hong Kong-based Oasis Capital Management, which owns shares of Nintendo. The company maintains that releasing its content on third-party platforms would negatively affect its business model, but Fischer wants this to change. "It is readily apparent that the standard elasticity of demand principle no longer applies in the consumer entertainment market when access requires the purchase of a physical product," Fischer said. A Nintendo spokesperson would not comment on whether or not the company will genuinely consider Fischer's request. If past comments from Nintendo management are anything to go by, don't expect Nintendo to offer Mario or Zelda games for your iPhone anytime soon. Defending this long-held strategy last month, Iwata said whatever short-term benefit Nintendo might get from releasing its franchises for mobile devices isn't worth the risk of harming its longstanding policy of offering its franchises exclusively on Nintendo devices. Iwata said at the time that the rise of smart devices does not signal the end of traditional game consoles. "It's not that simple," he said. However, Iwata pointed out that Nintendo must find a way to use smartphones and tablets to nudge players toward the console version of its games. But "œit doesn't mean that we should put Mario on smartphones," he said at the time. Nintendo is currently facing increased scrutiny from investors like Fischer, as the company's earnings reports of late have missed the mark substantially. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-02-27
  If comments from DayZ creator Dean Hall are anything to go by, it sounds like Microsoft is cooking up some exciting new features for the Xbox One. After meeting with Microsoft to discuss a console version of DayZ, Hall said he got to see some "really interesting" features coming to the platform, though he's not allowed to discuss them just yet. "I have nothing against consoles, and there's some really interesting and exciting things happening. That was one of the cool things about meeting with Microsoft," Hall told Eurogamer. "There were definitely some things they said that I'm not allowed to talk about that I was like, 'Wow! That's interesting. Why don't you tell people that?' But I guess they want to make sure everything all goes together and that." Unfortunately, Hall gave no additional information about what these exciting new Xbox One features might be. For its part, Microsoft has maintained that the Xbox One product roadmap is a marathon, not a sprint, with new features and functionality rolling out over time.   Hall also said that he's met with Sony to discuss a console version of DayZ for presumably the PlayStation 3 and/or PlayStation 4. He explained that a decision about a console version of DayZ is likely to be made by the end of 2014. He made clear that a console iteration of the zombie game is not in development right now, and if it does get green-lit, it will probably take 12 months to create a console version. Elsewhere in the interview, Hall said the full version of DayZ will probably launch sometime in the spring or summer of 2015. The game has already sold 1.5 million copies through its in-development Early Access alpha version. A beta is expected to go live before the end of 2014. And when DayZ does see its full, finished release, Hall said he anticipates that the game might be significantly different than the version we know today. "It could even be fundamentally different," Hall said. "As some of these new features come on--even some of the things we introduce now--it suddenly changes the whole way the game's played. We finally got it so that ruined objects don't really work any more; that suddenly changed the way players were behaving. If you shoot someone and destroy their gear, it doesn't work any more. Even little things like that can have profound effects." Hall confirmed this week that he will leave the DayZ development team by the end of the year and return to his home country of New Zealand. However, his contract stipulates that he's required to be involved with the future of the game in some capacity on an ongoing basis.   Info from Gamespot.com
2014-02-27
Trials is one of the few games that's pretty much universally adored for its "just one more go" feel. Indeed, I've ploughed many an hour into it, desperately attempting to beat my shockingly talented friends on the leaderboards. With such a big following behind the game, and an ever-growing pool of user generated content to pull from, it'd be easy for developer Red Lynx to knock out a few new tracks and bikes and call it a day. Fortunately, though, the studio--with a little help from its new owners Ubisoft--have done much, much more. And so, in the time-honoured tradition of listing things, here's six things you need to know about Trials Fusion. It's oh so colourful Much like how Killzone: Shadow Fall surprised people with its sudden love for all things colourful, so too does Trials Fusion. Gone are the overly brown areas of old, replaced instead with sharp, shiny surfaces, and heaps of bright colours. It's a far more joyful thing to look at, and indeed there's lots more going on in each level too. Where Trials Evolution began to take the series into some zany directions with its level design, Fusion totally goes for broke. The early level Fusion Factory places you in is a shiny steel factory, complete with platforms that float in from a distance and light up as you drive over them. Turbine Terror takes place on a rapidly collapsing wind farm, Base Invader floats in the air on wind turbines, and Eco Park has you driving over exploding solar panels and through rings of fire. The end of each level is particularly ludicrous, with the poor Trials driver getting shot up into the air on a rocket, thrown through multiple glass panes, or zapped to death in the middle of an energy reactor. Suffice it to say, there's plenty going on with Fusion's visuals. You can play tennis with a penguin There's also plenty going on with Fusion's levels in terms of challenges, with three per track. The usual suspects are there, like completing a certain amount of flips during a level, or acing a particularly tricky jump. But there are some more, shall we say, cryptic challenges assigned to each level. In Eco Park, for instance, there's a challenge that involves purposefully reversing into a fiery pit. Stay there long enough without resetting the bike and the level starts again, only this time you're flying through the air on a rocket-powered bike trying to guide it through rings of fire. On the same level there's a hidden button you can reverse onto, which changes the level from daytime to nighttime, and increases the difficulty dramatically. Other levels showcase Red Lynx's rather odd love for penguins. Yes, there are penguins everywhere in Trials Fusion, some in full view, others hidden behind challenges. On the snow-covered level Expedition, if you reverse into a certain cave you fall in a particularly painful-looking fashion into a penguin hideout. There, viewed from the first-person, you're treated to a humorous, if slightly terrifying gathering of penguins over your now deceased Trials rider. My favourite moment has to go to the Park and Ride level, though, where you can stop your bike on a tennis court and play tennis against a penguin--and it's a penguin that's damn good at tennis too. The controls were a bit awkward, and the hit box for the rather odd-looking tennis racket was very forgiving, but that was all part of the charm. Besides, you get a bunch of XP for beating the penguin, not to mention the satisfaction of wiping the creepy smile off its face (you'll see what I mean when you get your hands on Fusion). Quad bikes! Two wheels? Pah! Real men only ride on four, with a beer in one hand, a freshly shot deer in the other, and a hulking great slab of beef drooping out their mouths--cooked rare, natch. Sadly, you'll have to provide your own beer, deer, and beef for Fusion, but you can at least roll around on four wheels thanks to the inclusion of quad bikes. It's not the first time quads have appeared in Trials game, thanks to some neat user generated content for Evolution, but they are the first to come from Red Lynx. There there are levels specifically designed for the increased speeds, weight, and slightly more forgiving handling of the quad, but once it's unlocked you can take it out on any of Fusion's tracks. It's good fun too, making some levels easier and others more difficult, particularly those with delicate jumps. I didn't find a level I couldn't complete with it, though, at least in my brief time with the game. You can also take the quad out in multiplayer (once again featuring four players) against other motocross bikes and the always-hilarious pushbike, which makes for some wonderfully topsy-turvy races. Oh, and yes, you can still flip 'em like a pro if you want to. Stunts! Flipping a quad bike is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to stunts in Fusion, though. For the first time you can perform actual, proper tricks on your bike. The tricks themselves are based on freestyle motorcross (FMX) and aren't, I'm told, just simple animations, but are instead hooked into the physics system. So, when you're hanging off the back of your bike performing a Superman, the extra weight means you've got to quickly adjust your angle so you don't spin out. Tricks are performed by pushing the right analogue stick in different directions, which sounds easy enough, but when you've got to try and keep the bike balanced using the left stick at the same time, thinks get tricky. The angle of your bike also affects which tricks you perform, while doing spins at the same time nets you more points. While you can perform tricks on any level you like, they're only score on specific levels designed just for them that feature big jumps and ramps, as well as FMX-specific challenges. There's also a new, very agile FMX bike to use, and a neat training simulator that floats your bike in midair. There you can try out tricks like Ruler, where you do a handstand on the bike; Underdog, where you hang off the handlebar one handed; and the always entertaining Proud Hero, where you stand on top of it and pose for the camera. There's a story (sort of) No, I don't expect you wanted a narrative in a new Trials game either. But hey, we've got one! Fortunately, it isn't the heavy-handed CGI-fest the game's E3 trailer hinted at. Instead, there are subtle nods from a computerized AI voice that something's amiss with the world around you. After all, casually driving a motocross bike across exploding missile silos isn't your everyday occurrence. The idea is that the world is coming to a rather gruesome end. The further you get into Fusion's levels, the more destructive (and of course more difficult) they become. The narrative is pretty loose, and to be honest, if it hadn't been pointed out to me that there was one, I wouldn't have noticed. For something like Trials, that can only be a good thing. After all, no one wants to be thrust into a cutscene while they're trying to shave precious seconds off a track time. The main reason for Fusion's narrative leanings is the mobile spinoff Trials Frontier. Unfortunately, I didn't get to check out the game itself (although if you live in Canada or Finland you can download it now), but I was told that it's set after the events of Fusion in some sort of post-apocalyptic wasteland. Oh, and it's free-to-play too, and--if early reports are anything to go by--not in the good way. There's a season pass and DLC Fortunately, Fusion hasn't gone down the free-to-play route. Instead, there's the promise of more content in the form of feature updates and content packs. While Red Lynx didn't go into too much detail on what's going to be in the updates, new outfits for your Trials rider, and new levels are on the way. Indeed, if you pick up a copy of Fusion for Xbox One or PlayStation 4 at retail it'll come bundled with a season pass, giving you access to future updates at no extra charge. If you'd rather not pay for it, Fusion once again includes a full level editor, letting you create your own tracks or download the creations of others. Given that Evolution currently sports hundreds of thousands of bits of UGC, it's hopeful we'll see the same level of support for Fusion. Honestly, once the Trials bug has bitten you, it's hard to go back. And, judging by the stellar work Red Lynx has done so far, Trials Fusion is shaping up to be just as compulsive an experience as its predecessors.   Info from Gamespot.com
2014-02-27
Trials Fusion will hit digital stores on April 16 and retail shelves on April 18 in the UK, publisher Ubisoft announced today. The digital version will cost £15.99. No price was revealed for the retail version. In the United States, Trials Fusion will launch April 16 and the digital version for Xbox 360, Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC will sell for $20. A physical version for Xbox One and PS4 will be available at retail for $40 in the US. The Xbox One and PlayStation 4 retail versions of Trials Fusion will come bundled with a season pass, giving players access to six upcoming DLC packs that will be released up until April 30 2015. The season pass can also be purchased separately for £15.99. Developer Red Lynx's managing director Tero Virtala told GameSpot "Trials has always been a digital game, but it's also coming to retail. It's selling for Xbox One and PlayStation 4 and it combines the full game and the season pass." "In April, when people get their hands on Trials, they'll find it is the biggest and best Trials game ever. But we already have a roadmap of expansions, content packs and a plan for how we intend to keep on growing the game and making it bigger and better." Previous games in the Trials series have been released exclusively on Xbox 360 and PC, and only as a digital download. For more on Trials Fusion, check out GameSpot's latest preview. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-02-27
When Eidos Montreal's Thief reboot was first revealed, it was hard not to notice that it looked a lot like Arkane Studios' steampunk stealth-action game, Dishonored. It's not because Eidos Montreal is a copycat. Thief and Dishonored share a complex, intertwining development history. Key developers involved with the original Thief trilogy were a part of the team that created Dishonored and have stated the games were one of its biggest influences, so it's no coincidence that the games look and feel similar. But the actual Thief brand has remained tucked away under Eidos' coat, so the question remains: Which of these two games better accomplishes the goals of their respective developers? Is it possible that Dishonored is a better stealth action game than Eidos Montreal's Thief reboot? Here are four high-level goals each game happens to pursue; which accomplished them better? An Authentic World Both Thief and Dishonored strive to create believable and convincing worlds for you to inhabit. The basis for their respective locales is one and the same: Victorian-era London. Thief takes a literal approach, attempting to re-create the smokey alleyways and grand landmarks of the time. Dishonored pushes its world further into the realm of the fantastical, with its buildings augmented by strange steampunk security devices and other mechanical contraptions. Despite these eccentric additions, Dishonored's world feels more authentic. It may not have the immediate graphical fidelity of Thief, but it makes up for it with an interesting and internally consistent art direction, along with large and atmospheric levels, that lend the game's city of Dunwall a strong sense of place. Thief is unable to achieve this because of its technical shortcomings. The game's visual fidelity appears to come at the expense of an ability to render large levels. Exploring The City's hub world is less of an atmospheric stroll and more of a constant assault of loading screens. Even in missions, the game cannot render the entire location at once, so Garrett is forced through a linear progression of smaller locations. This destroys any true sense of place that Thief could potentially achieve. You can see the cracks in the world, because it is not stitched together seamlessly. Advantage: Dishonored   Creative Choices One of Eidos Montreal's goals with this Thief reboot was to introduce a greater element of player choice to the stealth gameplay. This doesn't mean the developer wanted to turn Garrett into a master swordsman; rather, it wanted to give you tools to push the boundaries of exploration and sneaking, whilst still keeping Garrett vulnerable enough to want to avoid direct combat. But the static nature of Thief's world means the developer hasn't achieved this. Interactive elements and aspects of the environment that provide opportunities, such as flammable puddles of oil and rope arrow anchors, appear in fixed, predetermined locations. Every solution or opportunity has been hand-placed by a designer. Unlike in previous Thief games, where you could throw oil flasks and ignite them anywhere, or shoot rope arrows into any wooden surface, you never feel as though you're designing your own solution in this reboot. Direct combat is more possible in this reboot than in previous Thief games, but it's a messy, cumbersome affair that hinges on the use of Garrett's focus powers rather than your skill alone. The static and highly telegraphed nature of Thief's routes does not create the same sense of achievement as organically creating a new pathway in Dishonored does. Dishonored upholds the core tenets of player choice and creativity with far greater success. This is partly because it is not exclusively a stealth game, and it fully supports actions which fall across the entire spectrum of stealth and combat. Additionally, its protagonist is imbued with supernatural power, so Dishonored's abilities do not need to be as reserved as those in Thief. But even when you adopt a stealth-focused playstyle, Dishonored's supernatural powers and first-person movement remain systemic and general purpose enough that they can be employed and combined in clever and creative ways. Though both games offer multiple routes through their levels, the static and highly telegraphed nature of Thief's routes does not create the same sense of achievement as organically creating a new pathway in Dishonored does. On the whole, the player choice available in Dishonored is more inventive and more rewarding than that in Thief.   Advantage: Dishonored   A City in Chaos The City of Thief and Dishonored's port city of Dunwall are both beset by hardships: plagues, tyranny, and dark, mystical forces working behind the scenes. Over the course of both games, each city changes and evolves as a part of the plot. In Thief, life is always going to go from bad to worse. But in Dishonored, the decline of Dunwall depends upon your playstyle. If you play stealthily, without killing too many people, the city won't appear to get much worse. However, when you adopt a violent, "high chaos" play style, it's possible to witness greater swarms of plague-carrying rats, and the resulting plague victims, appear in later levels. Should you choose to continue this approach, the final mission will exhibit a dark, apocalyptic aesthetic. The more people you kill, the worse off the city will appear, through a subtle, tonal evolution over the game's entire runtime. Thief's plot implies The City's hardships will manifest in a more immediately perceptible manner. As the story unfolds, the oppressed underclasses turn to protest and, later, violence. Whipped into action by a fanatical leader, the poor take to the streets and ignite a revolution. At least, that's what the plot and concept art in Thief's loading screens suggest. In reality, this uprising is never realised. Eidos Montreal intended to show this revolution taking place over repeated visits to the hub world between missions. But there are so few non-player characters present that it's hard to get a sense of any civil unrest taking place. As far as the depiction of a city descending into chaos goes, Dishonored's violent players are treated to a decline which unfolds with greater tangibility and significance.       Advantage: Dishonored First-Person Immersion Thief and Dishonored share a common lineage in the immersive simulation subgenre--a design philosophy that began at the developer of the first Thief game, Looking Glass Studios. These games are usually played in first-person and focus on instilling a strong sense of self in the way you inhabit the body of the protagonist, along with believable interactions with that protagonist's consistent and immersive environment. For Thief, Eidos Montreal has opted to maintain full body awareness, going so far as to animate the hand motions associated with every swiping of loot, opening of a door, or climbing of a wall. At first glance, this is one of the most literal interpretations of body awareness the first-person genre has ever seen. But the developer accomplished this by prescribing points of interaction to very specific objects to ensure everything animates correctly. The result is a stilted and clunky first-person experience, exacerbated by the inability to jump, which leads to inconsistent traversal detection when using the sprint/climb button. Dishonored allows you to jump and clamber over any surface that is logically within reach. Dishonored takes a different approach. You won't see your legs if you look down, and your hands don't animate when you pick up items or interact with minor objects in the world. But the first-person experience is so much stronger than in Thief, because you are provided with a broad set of moves which can be employed consistently no matter where you are in the environment. Dishonored allows you to jump and clamber over any surface that is logically within reach, and its environments are designed to fully support that action. Where Thief attempts to create an immersive experience with a more literal interpretation of body awareness, Dishonored finds far greater success with its more abstract approach because your ability to move through and interact with the world is internally consistent.     Advantage: Dishonored   The Decider Though Thief and Dishonored offer slightly different power fantasies, they still strive to create immersive first-person experiences within authentic worlds, whilst offering you creative choices through the use of their systems and toolsets. But it's Dishonored that accomplishes these goals with far greater confidence in itself and its players, ultimately proving that having the Thief name doesn't necessarily make for a great Thief game. The Victor: Dishonored Info from Gamespot.com
2014-02-27
  Diablo III's long-awaited Patch 2.0.1. has arrived, and while it introduces a lengthy list of updates including the highly touted Loot 2.0 system, it also brings with it a series of bugs. The patch was released yesterday in North America, a month ahead of the Reaper of Souls expansion on March 25, and should be available on servers worldwide today. Over on the Blizzard forums, a quality assurance representative for the developer has compiled a list of known issues--which spans dozens of items affecting multiple facets of the game. Some of these issues do not affect gameplay and are only a minor inconvenience, like a bug that makes it so your total play time shows the wrong information. However, other issues like the game becoming stuck at the home screen when entering a multiplayer game or losing the bonus you should have received from the Pools of Reflection, are more problematic. You can check out Blizzard's complete roundup of known issues for Diablo III on the company's forums. The developer cautioned that the bugs featured in this post are the most severe/impactful, and only represent a sample of the "hundreds" of bugs currently in the game's database. There is no timeline for when the issues will be cleared. For more on Diablo III's Patch 2.0.1, be sure to read GameSpot's preview of the content featuring comments from lead designer Kevin Martens. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-02-27
Rambo is an icon of masculinity. The testosterone-flooded film series that began with First Blood in the '80s has given us the term "going Rambo" anytime someone decides to take on insurmountable challenges in a video game. And for the first time in many years, we have a video game that lets you inhabit the role of John Rambo. Developer Teyon could have done a lot of things with Rambo: The Video Game. With all of the tools available today, a veritable sandbox could have been made of the jungles of Vietnam and the city of Hope, Washington. But Teyon didn't do that. It made Rambo a rail shooter that leads you through its levels by the nose, letting you instead focus on hovering your targeting reticle over the bad guys and gunning them down. Headshots are worth more, in terms of both damage and point values, and the game encourages you to kill as much as fast as you can. Kill streaks multiply your score and increase the multiplier based off how rapidly you kill. From moment to moment, the action is simple but frantic, inviting you to set aside your expectations of what a Rambo video game should be, and enjoy it for what it is. Gun 'em down. "I'm here to talk to you about a man who killed dozens. John Rambo. And it's good that he's dead." These are the words you hear at the funeral that launches the game. From there, you play a flashback mission as the war hero John Rambo in Vietnam, guns ablazin' as you attempt to escape being a prisoner of war. Here you discover the game's cover system, which allows you to take cover in three different directions at any given time, leaving you exposed to some foes while shielded from others depending on the direction you take. It's a step up from the arcade limitation that typically leaves you with "in cover" or "shooting" as your only options. The mission also introduces you to the wrath bar, and Wrath mode, which enables you to regain your health and get back to going Rambo by killing as many enemies as possible before the bar depletes. Which is worse, shaving dry or dull quick-time events? After war, regular life just isn't the same. Rambo is thrown into jail by the sheriff of Hope, Washington. But it's not prison that makes his life hell. It's quick-time events. As the bully deputies attempt to shave Rambo with a straight razor, he rebels and escapes through a series of nothing but properly timed button presses. The quick-time events in the game offer more points if you press them with proper timing, but mostly act as a boring and clichéd way to add interactivity to cinematic events. Throughout the remainder of the first chapter of story missions, you're encouraged to avoid killing your foes, because simply disarming them gives bonus points. After all, those are American citizens you're shooting at, soldier! By the end of the chapter, you find yourself sympathizing with poor mass-murdering John Rambo, because he really didn't mean to hurt anyone. Well, apart from those Vietcong. After taking down the sheriff standing in your way of a normal life, you finally earn the peace and quiet you wanted all along. Back in prison, again! The story does follow the movie series' plotlines, with major stages and events hewing as close as possible to the source material while still under the guise of a video game. (Forgetting, of course, that Mr. Rambo was not the killing machine pop culture has made him out to be.) Of course, since Stallone wasn't available to do voice acting for the game, Teyon decided to instead use sound bites directly from the movies. This causes the volume levels of different cinematics to vary wildly. Coupled with the game's atrocious graphics, Rambo is a painful experience for the eyes and ears, with only the limited but excellent soundtrack rising above the ugliness. The somber brass of the main menu and funeral scene, the melodic strings that tie the plot together, and the upbeat tracks that fuel the explosive carnage of combat are perfectly at home and enjoyable to listen to in their own right. Complete challenges to unlock new guns? I'm in. In addition to the contextual directional cover system, there are well-placed explosive barrels, good incentives for proper aim over spraying and praying, and enough challenge in (some of) the missions to keep this generally easy game from being a complete cakewalk. Luckily, there's also a higher difficulty setting, and a one- to three-star-based scoring system that encourages you to always do better than the time before. And if that weren't enough, the game offers specific objectives to shoot for in the hopes of earning a brand-new shiny gun to wield as a secondary weapon. If you're having trouble perfecting your approach to missions or challenges, then it's time to delve into the game's skill and perk system. The game offers perks varying from being unable to fail QTE events (wait, really?) to gaining health back from headshots or disarming opponents, to bonuses to your Wrath mode. With up to three perk slots able to be unlocked, you can customize John Rambo to your own tastes or the task at hand. The skill system gives you the ability to upgrade your damage resistance, light weapons, heavy weapons, miscellaneous weapons, or your Wrath mode, but I didn't find any reason to invest in anything but damage resistance or Wrath mode in lower levels. The perks system reeks of poor balance and the charade of choice. Enemies die in two or three properly-aimed shots, so skills granting bonus damage aren't necessary, and it only takes a few turns of the reload wheel to get the hang of reloading, thus diminishing the usefulness of light- and heavy-weapon expertise. Rambo: The Video Game does a solid job of breaking potential monotony with various alternate battle methods. Although some of these involve moving from quick-time event to quick-time event, you're also given a helping of helicopter missions and an opportunity to use enemies' own tanks against them. While these segments don't last long, they also are neither overused nor overdone, and offer a breather from the game's gauntlet of gun battles. Dogfighting with helicopters doesn't sound safe. The game's initial playthrough doesn't take more than a few hours, but becoming a master of the game can take a bit more investment. You don't have to be a fan of the Rambo franchise to enjoy Rambo: The Video Game, but it helps to have at least spent a bit of time in an arcade as a light-gun-slinger. And this time around, you don't have to stock your pockets full of quarters to prepare to blast your way through screen after screen of Vietcong, Afghan, and Soviet enemies. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-02-27
Against seemingly impossible odds, the Twitch Plays Pokemon stream has collected all of the game's badges and is getting ready to take on the Elite Four. If you'd like a complete recap of events, Reddit has put together an exhaustively time-stamped recap, or you can read a more narrative retelling. But this public Google document is the easiest way to see at a glance what's up in the game. According to the document, the players are working towards getting past one of the game's trickier ledge sections (tricky when you have 50,000 people playing, at least) as they head towards Victory Road. Also notable is that the stream was able to revive the Helix fossil into the Pokemon Omanyte. The Helix Fossil is an item given to the player early in the game that cannot be thrown away; it has been elevated to a savior-like status in the chat with prayers of "Praise Helix" and "Base Helix." Users are able to balance the game by shifting control between an Anarchy mode (where every command from the chat is input into the game) and Democracy (where the most popular commands go through). But none of the spin-off games (like QWOP and Tetris) have reached the same level of incredible popularity. The phenomenon has seen some drop-off from it's high count of over 100k viewers, currently sitting at just over 50k viewers, though it's likely the game will see another uptick as it nears its conclusion. Are you going to tune in more frequently now that it's over? And if so, will you work to sabotage the people trying to finish the game, or are you part of the group trying to shift the game to democracy, order, and finality? Either way, Pokemon Plays Twitch has turned out to be a surprising experiment that no one could've seen coming. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-02-27
  Criterion Games has announced a special promotion--valid today only--where Burnout Paradise players can download the Legendary Cars pack for free on Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3.   The promotion honors Harold Ramis, the Hollywood comedy legend known for his role as Egon Spengler in the Ghostbusters movies who died earlier this week. The Legendary Cars pack features homages to iconic vehicles from famous movies including one made to look like Ecto 1 from the Ghostbusters franchise. "Harold Ramis was a comedy genius. He inspired us," Criterion Games said on Twitter. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-02-27
    Titanfall won't take up as much of your Xbox One hard drive space as previously thought. Respawn Entertainment community manager Abbie Heppe confirmed on Twitter that the game will require a 20GB install, not "up to 40GB," as was reported on Monday. The 40GB figure came from the packaging of the special-edition Titanfall Xbox One bundle. Heppe told DualShockers that the discrepancy was probably due to the fact that the packaging was created before the final file size was confirmed. At 20GB, Titanfall is significantly smaller than other popular shooters like Battlefield 4 (33GB) and Call of Duty: Ghosts (39GB). Notably, however, Titanfall does not feature a traditional single-player campaign like those other two games, which no doubt affects the file size. Titanfall does not run in 1080p on Xbox One, instead outputting at a native resolution of 792p. Meanwhile, the PC version of Titanfall requires at least 50GB of free hard drive space. The game's hefty size on PC could come down to a number of elements, including its reported "Insane" texture resolution setting. The full minimum requirements for Titanfall are listed below. OS: Windows Vista SP2 64-bit / Windows 7 SP1 64-bit / Windows 8 64-bit CPU: AMD Athlon X2 2.8GHz / Intel Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz RAM: At least 4 GB HARD DRIVE: At least 50 GB of free space VIDEO: AMD Radeon HD 4770 with 512MB RAM or better / Nvidia GeForce 8800GT with 512MB RAM or better DirectX: DirectX 11 INPUT: Keyboard and mouse, Microsoft Gamepad ONLINE CONNECTION REQUIREMENTS: 512kbps down and 384kbps up or faster Internet connection Developed by a team of former Call of Duty designers, including Infinity Ward cofounder Vince Zampella, Titanfall launches March 11 for Xbox One and PC. An Xbox 360 version--developed externally at Bluepoint Games--will launch two weeks later on March 25. For more on Titanfall, be sure to check out our feature, The Next Big Game: Titanfall, which includes exclusive interviews, previews, and videos for the game. Info from Gamespot.com
2014-02-27
SimCity's influence, both on the strategy genre and on gaming in general, is immense. Still, the past few years have seen an explosion of clever city builders taking some huge steps toward developing personality and becoming more than their progenitor. Banished is the latest in that line, elaborating on the intricate, small-scale design of recent games like Tropico and creating something unique in the process. If you're reading this, it's safe to assume that you have an Internet-capable device with all of the modern comforts that typically implies. But what if you didn't? What if you were forced out of civilization as you know it, to live in the wilderness? How do you think you'd fare? Banished asks those questions, opening with a dozen or so outcasts seeking to make their way in the wilderness. It's a humble setup, but the game is masterfully constructed with dozens of interlocking mechanics--the perfect foundation for a stinging emergent narrative and a focus on empathy in the face of a Malthusian world. Cultivating crops can be one of the best ways to keep some consistent food coming in. Be warned, however. Too much farming will deplete the soil. Banished is a series of small goals that feed into one ever-looming command: survive. Every game starts in the spring, and before winter hits, you need to get enough firewood, gather a decent supply of food, and build some houses to keep your citizens from freezing to death. Just getting enough food is tough, because you rarely have enough time or free land to get a proper set of crops growing. Instead, you'll be chopping down as many trees as you can before getting a fishery going in a nearby lake or river. Then you hunker down and hope nobody dies. What if you were forced out of civilization as you know it, to live in the wilderness? How do you think you'd fare? Banished asks those questions, opening with a dozen or so outcasts seeking to make their way alone in the wilderness. People, more than anything else, are your vital resource. They need homes, food, decent clothes, tools, emotional support, medicine, and more. Every mechanic, every building you can place, and everything else you can do relates back to that central theme of survival. If you can't gather enough food, your people die. If they're stuck outside for too long, or don't have warm clothing, they die. Each time you fail as their leader, you're reminded of the loss with a grating sound and a yellow gravestone. These serve as a one-two punch to punish you for failure because losing citizens makes it that much harder to keep up the resource flow. One fewer worker means you can't gather food, stone, wood, or anything else as quickly. When children die, it's even worse, though you likely won't know it for some time. As your population ages, you eventually lose more than a few citizens to old age, and the best way to replace them is to give your younger citizens houses in the hopes that they'll reproduce and bolster your future numbers. Like most games of its type, Banished has a number of natural disasters that strike your populace. In many ways, they serve as a kind of random "boss fight" in the sense that they will often test one aspect of your infrastructure. Diseases test the health of your population, fires your city planning, and tornadoes your ability to rapidly rebuild before winter comes again. With Banished already amounting to a desperate attempt to stave off death, disasters can be absolutely devastating for the unprepared. When pests hit your crops and you're already barely squeaking by each year, you're going to start losing a lot of people. Those kinds of cascading failures contrast with the almost hilarious scenarios that surround SimCity's giant robots or aliens. Societal collapse isn't caused just by disasters, though, as maintaining equilibrium with the environment is actually impossible, which is another point of contrast between Banished and other games in its family. Most of the time, resources are unlimited in these sorts of games, but not quite so here. Farms won't continue producing food indefinitely, and most fishermen's docks steadily deplete the available population of fish that you can draw upon. Stone and iron, two critical materials for construction and maintenance, are also finite. After your initial stores run out, you can find some of these materials out in the world, but once you've exhausted those reserves, you're left with two options: trading and mining. Trading is a lot harder than it sounds, as opportunities come only a few times each year. Trade ships also have limited space and don't carry too much with them. Additionally, accepting trade increases your risk of disease and pests for your people and your crops. Mines are just as troublesome. Their supply of stone, iron, and coal is finite, and they take an enormous number of people to operate efficiently; they are also deadly, potentially risking mineshaft collapses or being crushed to death by stone. This, of course, all leads back to the struggle of maintaining your population. Societal collapse isn't caused just by disasters, though, as maintaining equilibrium with the environment is actually impossible. Banished has dozens of these kinds of interlocking, intricately woven systems that all feed into one another. Every decision has a cost, and every choice is a risk. Some elements of city planning are also completely incompatible with each other. To maintain your peoples' health, for example, you need some herbalists. They collect basic resources from the floors of old growth forests and can use them to make poultices that keep your people working their best and resistant to possible disease outbreaks. The key, however, is the "old growth" bit. You also need a steady source of logs to chop up for firewood. A good team of foresters can maintain a large enough area of continuous growth, but helpful herbs and wildlife can't be found in such young forests. To maximize your production, you need separate forests for your potion masters and your loggers. This dynamic becomes much harder to balance with the addition of resource-distribution mechanics. Loggers that need to transport the fruits of their labor more than a few tiles begin to lose efficiency and increase the risk of running low on firewood or tools--the two main long-term uses for lumber. If any of these pieces begin to lag, you place yourself and your people at risk of a systemic failure. A reduction in logging output can cause your supply of new tools to run low, dropping your logging output that much further. Everything is a feedback loop. Such strongly linked systems require an enormous amount of care to manage effectively, and that most often comes into play when you're looking to expand your village. If you try to develop a new logging outpost without building a network of roads, supply barns, and the like to make sure the resources keep moving where they are needed, your new loggers will likely die of starvation or hypothermia. You must effectively build semi-self-sufficient towns that link together via markets and high-capacity roads. The game isn't completely unreasonable here, though. If you build a new house near a mine on the edge of town, a few people will probably move in, and their occupation automatically shifts to match the closest workspace that can support them. When everything works, Banished is remarkably rewarding. While the process of survival is never-ending, holding out against the elements amid the hostility of the untamed natural world is a small but powerful personal victory. Villagers have names; they're born, grow up, and eventually die under your intense supervision. Banished reinforces the human drama with its brutal difficulty and negative feedback loops. It's fertile soil for some of the most remarkable emergent storytelling around. With relatively few, well-designed mechanics, the game weaves a powerful tale of empathy and desperation and is a high-water mark for narrative elements that mutually reinforce mechanics. Even better, this is a very human story divorced from the Western tropes common in the loosely imperialistic messages of other, similar games. It's just you, your people, and their strong desire to live. Info from Gamespot.com


Keywords:

Free online games to play and download! More than 1000 free flash games updated daily, free online web games, games to play free, free download, free games to download, free download games, ready for game, ready for games, игры, безплатная игра, angry birds, mario, arcade, puzzle, shooting, free online games, monster trucks, action games, card online, pool games, strategic games, all games for free, play free online games, jeux en ligne gratuits, gratis aanlyn speletjies, lojra online falas, besplatne online igre, online hry zdarma, gratis online spil, gratis online spelletjes, kostenlose Online Spiele, giochi online gratis, jocuri online gratuite, бесплатные онлайн игры, Juegos online, ücretsiz online oyun, Jocs en línia, meine front, meinefront, run mario, penguin dinner, deus racer, sudoku, motor wheels, ultimate force, play and download free flash games, download free swf game files, best games

Advertisement

Contacts

All questions and suggestions for site

Email us: support@readyforgame.com

Social Stalking

Login

LOG IN

Register

User Registration
or Cancel